Archive for the ‘Exercise’ Category

6. Exercise: Set of online principles

March 11, 2008

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Formulate a set of principles that you would use to teach students about good online citizenship. What would your principles cover in terms of IP? Defamation? Courtesy? Privacy?

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6. Exercise: Institutional guidelines

March 11, 2008

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What policies or guidelines set out by your organisation will you have to take into account when using blogs in class? Are there rules about how your organisation is presented to the world? Will you have to make your organisation anonymous?

6. Exercise: Managing risk

March 11, 2008

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Think of a project or assignment that you would use blogs for in class. Consider how you will manage the risks associated with putting the assignment into the blogging environment. Will you shut everything down? Will you educate students in good online behaviour and monitor things closely? Are you prepared to oversee student blogs and to moderate where necessary? How quickly can you, as an administrator of a blog, remove offensive or potentially compromising content?

5. Exercise: Your assessment rubric

March 11, 2008

tools-48x48.png Write up a class blogging plan, taking into account the ‘dos and don’ts’ of class blogging. Write up an assessment rubric. What will you be measuring? Writing? Technological competence? Appearance of the blog?

4. Exercise: Blogging in your class

March 11, 2008

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Think of a class context in which you would want to use blogs. Create a design for your students’ educational experience, based on the considerations outlined above. What learning outcomes do you want? What blogging strategies and tasks will you use so that your students reach those outcomes?

3. Exercise: Your blogging plan

March 8, 2008

tools-48x48.png Begin to formulate your blogging plan. Will you be blogging for students, or will you ask students to blog themselves? What is the purpose of the blog? Is it for other teachers? For communication with students or parents? For student learning? Below are some places to start.

3. Exercise: Analyse some blogs

March 8, 2008

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Find examples of each type of blog: a teacher-for-teachers blog, a student/parent communication blog, a student blog for a particular class or course. Analyse and then compare them for effectiveness, communication style, usefulness for the intended audience, ease of finding the right info. Select a blog that you would refer to as a model for your own classroom blog and explain why you would use it.

3. Exercise: Brainstorm blogging

March 8, 2008

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Brainstorm other uses can you think of for blogs in the classroom. Separate things out according to your blogging purpose: for other teachers, for students, by students. Once you’ve got a topic area, start thinking about the content: what would you include in terms of issues, specifics, links?

2. Exercise: Effectiveness of blogging

March 8, 2008

tools-48x48.pngNext, evaluate the effectiveness of the blogging enterprises you come across: Are the students engaged? Are they responding to others’ blog posts? Are they posting their own material? Are posts focused and on-topic? Are the posts interesting? What is the quality of the writing like? What about the thinking? Is the blog easy to navigate? Blog your evaluations. Have you found any dodgy examples of classroom blogging? What makes them dodgy?

2. Exercise: Blogs in the classroom

March 8, 2008

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Search for some (Aussie) edublogs on the web to get a sense of how teachers of your year level are using blogs in their classrooms. Try to identify the purpose of the blog: Is it for communicating with students or parents? Is it posting assignment or class info? Do students have their own blogs for the class? Blog what you find by providing links and observations.